U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un shake hands during their summit at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore June 12, 2018.

Anthony Wallace | Pool | Reuters

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un shake hands during their summit at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore June 12, 2018.

In the short-term, many new CEOs make progress through financial engineering, showboating, and charming their shareholders. But the companies that have brought lasting value to the public markets produce real results, not just headlines.

In the case of the Singapore summit, Mike Pompeo has to try to repair the damage to our allies, and that might be possible in the short term. And just maybe a useful, and detailed dialogue with North Korea can emerge that will bring greater stability to Northeast Asia. But if I were an investments analyst, listening to the quarterly earnings call, I would mark the company no better than “hold,” and I’d watch the behavior and performance of the CEO very carefully in the quarter ahead. A reckless CEO, cashing in in credit ratings and assets, can lead a company to quick failure.

Since the end of World War II, the world has counted on the reliability, consistency and, yes, generosity, of the United States. We’ve made some mistakes and we’ve even been taken advantage of on occasion. But the remarkable achievements of decolonization, lifting billions from poverty, maintaining peace during the Cold War, and enlarging the sphere of personal freedoms and creativity wouldn’t have been possible without U.S. leadership. Now is not the time for the American people or our leader to cash out and move to Florida!

Commentary by Retired General Wesley Clark, a former NATO Supreme Allied Commander and a Senior Fellow at the UCLA Burkle Center. Follow him on Twitter @
GeneralClark
.

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