For the longest time, groping and voyeurism were victimless crimes in China for the simple reason that nobody wanted to be known as a victim. However, the days of “victim shaming” in China may have come to an end. 

READ: Hidden Camera in Chaoyang Office Restroom Explained Away as “Fengshui”

This past Monday, a woman named Xiaohe (a pseudonym) was having lunch at a 4th-floor noodle restaurant at Joy City Mall in Xidan when she saw a man sitting across from her acting suspiciously. Instead of using it in a normal fashion, Xiaohe saw the man nonchanlantly hold his phone underneath the table while pointing it towards her. 

Suspicious that the man was attempting to take photographs of her underneath her dress, Xiaohe made a recording of the man with her own phone (shown above). Although this seemed to temporarily stop the man, he wasn’t deterred for long.

“At first I thought I had misjudged him, but when he peeped at me, the look in his eyes scared me,” Xiaohe told the Evening Law Report. “That’s when I realized I wasn’t wrong about him.”

READ: Victim Live Streams Her Story of Plane Molestation, Beijing Tech Boss Perpetrator Released

Afraid for her personal safety, Xiaohe left the restaurant and called a male friend for help. When he arrived, Xiaohe and her friend located the suspicious man on the first floor of the mall, at which time they reported him to the police for public voyeurism.

Faced with the seriousness of his acts, the man not only fully confessed to police, but also got down on his knees and kowtowed for forgiveness when he was brought in to the police station.

As Kanfa News confirms, the unidentified man has been detained by police for “invasion of privacy.” It’s not clear if his detention is for a criminal arrest or for administrative detention, a punishment Chinese PSB departments can dispense without the need of a trial.

READ: Undercover Police Cracking Down on Beijing Subway Perverts

Monday’s humiliating ordeal for its perpetrator comes after a Beijing woman made national headlines for publicly confronting a subway groper. Seen grabbing her molester by the lapel and berating him in front of a train full of commuters, the woman was labeled a “hero” for her courage.

Unfortunately, standing up to sexual victimizers has proven to be dangerous, especially when a perpetrator’s sense of “face” is threatened. Last July, a man accused of groping a woman on a Beijing bus turned on his victim, slashing her back and throat with a knife.

As encouraging as it is that Chinese society is ready to put these gropers and voyeurs in their place, it seems that Chinese media retains a puritanical view of the fairer sex. Chinese news reports labelled Xiaohe a “girl” and even went so far as to describe the clothes she was wearing at the time of the incident.

More stories from this author here.

E-Mail: charlesliu1 (at) qq (dot) com
Twitter: @Sinopath

Images: BJ News, Miaopai



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